The past couple years have been great ones for mercury-free dentistry, starting with the FDA finally updating their guidance on a material they once insisted was safe for pretty much everyone. Today, they recommend against its use by certain groups who, collectively, make up nearly two-thirds of the US population:

  • Children, especially those under age 6.
  • Pregnant and nursing mothers.
  • Women who plan on pregnancy.
  • People with neurological conditions, such as MS, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s.
  • People with impaired kidney function.
  • Anyone sensitive to mercury or any other component of dental amalgam.

Thanks in part to this change, in part to the demands of the Minamata Convention, and in part to the ongoing efforts of organizations like Consumers for Dental Choice, the two largest manufacturers of dental products in the world soon announced that they would no longer sell the material.

And on top of that, an amendment to the Minamata Convention was approved that requires nations to ban or recommend against the use of mercury amalgam in children under age 15, as well as pregnant and nursing mothers. That rule goes into effect on Christmas Day of this year.

So, yes, although we still have a ways to go yet in completely eliminating this dangerous and antiquated material from dentistry here in the US, these accomplishments should go a long way in accelerating the journey toward a mercury-free future.

The documentary film Evidence of Harm makes a powerful case for why this is all such a big deal. If you’ve not yet seen it , settle back and watch it below. And if you have seen it, we encourage you to share this post with others you know who have yet to learn about the risk of mercury fillings. (You can also order copies on DVD here.)

 
This week is the annual Mercury-Free Dentistry Awareness Week, which is simultaneously a fundraiser for Consumers for Dental Choice to help them continue to fight the good fight for all of us. As in previous years, Dr. Mercola has pledged to match every donation this week, dollar-for-dollar.

And even if you’re not able to contribute financially, there are plenty of other ways you can get involved, which you can learn about here.

The more of us demanding that the dental profession do better, the better!
 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Skip to content